A Visit to the Delightful Rue Montorgueil Market Street

Montorguril

An extremely popular 2nd Arrondissement destination for both tourists and locals is the Rue Montorgueil market street, a five-block long lane between Rue Etienne Marcel and Rue Reaumur. Home to more than two dozen specialty food shops, cafes and bistros, including a patisserie founded nearly 280 years ago by the head pastry chef to king Louis XV, Rue Montorgueil is a real treat even if you’re just window shopping (called faire du leche-vitrines in French, which oddly translates to “window licking). Continue Reading →

Summer Trip to Paris? Don’t Miss the Tuileries Garden

Tuileries 5

Travelers to the City of Light definitely should not miss a chance to visit one of Paris’s many parks during the summer when then weather is warm and sunny, the trees are lush and rustling in the breezes off the Seine, and Parisians show up in force for picnics, sunbathing and to just stroll through and relax in these urban oases. One of my favorites is right in the heart of “Visitor’s Paris”–the Jardin des Tuilieries, which connects the Louvre with the Place de la Concorde. Continue Reading →

What To Do About Love Locks on the Pont des Arts?

Pont des Arts4

News out of Paris during the last few days is that the preponderance of padlocks attached to the Pont des Arts—a cultural phenomenon known as “love locks,” in which a couple inscribes their names on a lock, attaches it to the bridge, and throws the key into the Seine, symbolizing their eternal love—caused part of the bridge to collapse. Clearly, the phenomenon has reached a tipping point, as it were. So, what should be done? Here’s my take on how–and why–I hope the love locks can continue. Continue Reading →

Golden Statue Near the Louvre Honors Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc 1

Visitors to the Louvre and the Tuileries Gardens are often surprised to stumble across a glittering gold statue of a soldier on horseback, seemingly guarding the posh Hotel Regina that overlooks the area. And many snap pics of the equestrian sculpture without ever really knowing that they’ve captured the likeness of Jeanne d’Arc (Joan of Arc), a peasant from northeast France who became a commander in the French military and led several victories over the invading English forces during the Hundred Years’ War. Today, Jeanne d’Arc is a martyr of the Catholic Church and one of the nine patron saints of France. Continue Reading →